The ‘Blood Moon’ tonight will be longest Lunar eclipse in 100 years

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On the same night of the longest lunar eclipse of the 21st century, where the moon will turn blood red, Mars will also be brighter and bigger than it has been for 15 years


Tonight will see stargazers treated to the longest lunar eclipse of the century, which will see the moon turn a deep shade of crimson, making it appear as if it is drenched in blood.

Known as a ‘Blood Moon’, the phenomenon, which has caused some Christian fundamentalists to denounce the celestial event as a harbinger of doom, occurs when the moon passes behind the shadow of the Earth.

The staggering celestial event will last for around 103 minutes — just four minutes shy of the longest possible duration a lunar eclipse can ever last on our planet.

The ‘Blood Moon’ will be visible to people in the UK, Europe, Asia, Africa, parts of Australasia and South America.

Those hoping to watch the moon shift to its deep-red colour should look up at the sky from 8.30pm BST (7:30pm UTC) from a open space with minimal light pollution.  

The peak of the eclipse will occur at 9:21pm BST (8:22pm UTC).

US-based stargazers are likely to feel a little short changed, as the moon will be hidden below the horizon throughout the entire eclipse. 

Tonight will also see Mars appear bigger and brighter in the sky than it has for the last 15 years.

The likelihood of these events overlapping is astronomical, and those with clear skies need only look up to watch the rare celestial events unfold. 

Scroll down for video 

On the same night of the longest lunar eclipse of the 21st century, where the moon will turn blood red, Mars will also be brighter and bigger than it has been for 15 years

A lunar eclipse is a specific event which happens when Earth lines up directly between the sun and the moon. When this happens, Earth blocks the light from the sun to the moon. Earth's shadow then falls on the moon. During a lunar eclipse, we can see Earth¿s shadow on the moon

A lunar eclipse is a specific event which happens when Earth lines up directly between the sun and the moon. When this happens, Earth blocks the light from the sun to the moon. Earth’s shadow then falls on the moon. During a lunar eclipse, we can see Earth’s shadow on the moon

No specialist equipment is needed to see either celestial event tonight, with experts saying the naked eye will be more than enough to watch the century’s most impressive eclipse.

Unlike a solar eclipse – where the moon crosses in between the Earth and the sun – it is perfectly safe to look directly at the lunar eclipse without sunglasses or protective eyewear.

The total eclipse is set to last for 1 hour 43 minutes, with the partial eclipse visible for almost four hours. 

Mathematically, the longest a lunar eclipse could ever last is 1 hour 47 minutes.

The length of the eclipse is determined by the alignment of the Sun, Earth and the moon, as well as the distance between the moon and our planet.

The further away the moon is, the longer it will spend in the shadow – known as Umbra – of our planet.

Tonight, the moon is approaching its apogee, the furthest point away from us in its orbit.

This will be the longest lunar eclipse of the 21st Century, with the most impressive eclipse of the last century (1901-2000) taking place on July 16, 2000 and lasting for 1 hour 46.4 minutes.

The passing of the light through Earth's atmosphere will cast a crimson sheen over the moon as the rays of light bend. For light to reach the moon it must pass 'through', or around, Earth. If there is a large amount of particulate matter in the atmosphere the rate of refraction increases

The passing of the light through Earth’s atmosphere will cast a crimson sheen over the moon as the rays of light bend. For light to reach the moon it must pass ‘through’, or around, Earth. If there is a large amount of particulate matter in the atmosphere the rate of refraction increases

The total lunar eclipse on July 27 will be visible to large swathes of the Eastern hemisphere. It will reach peak eclipse at 9:22 (BST), however, the total eclipse will last for a total of 1 hour 43 minutes 

The total lunar eclipse on July 27 will be visible to large swathes of the Eastern hemisphere. It will reach peak eclipse at 9:22 (BST), however, the total eclipse will last for a total of 1 hour 43 minutes 

Tonight, the moon is approaching apogee, the furthest point away from us in its orbit. This will be the longest one of the 21st Century, and the most impressive eclipse of the 20th Century (1901-2000) happened on July 16, 2000

Tonight, the moon is approaching apogee, the furthest point away from us in its orbit. This will be the longest one of the 21st Century, and the most impressive eclipse of the 20th Century (1901-2000) happened on July 16, 2000

WHAT IS A LUNAR ECLIPSE?  

An eclipse occurs any time a planet or moon passes between another planet, moon or the sun.

Depending on their orbits, they can be total or partial.

A lunar eclipse is a specific event which happens when Earth lines up directly between the sun and the moon.

When this happens, Earth blocks the light from the sun to the moon. Earth’s shadow then falls on the moon.

During a lunar eclipse, we can see Earth’s shadow on the moon.

They can last for several hours, but it is rare for a period of total eclipse to last longer than 100 minutes.  

At least two lunar eclipses happen every year.

A lunar eclipse is a specific event which happens when Earth lines up directly between the sun and the moon

A lunar eclipse is a specific event which happens when Earth lines up directly between the sun and the moon

As the light from the sun passes through the Earth’s atmosphere, it will cast a crimson sheen over the moon.

This is due to the way rays of light bend around the planet to reach the surface of the moon. 

When there is a large amount of particulate matter in the atmosphere, the rate of refraction increases and shifts light towards the red end of the spectrum.

This is because red light is the only one with a wavelength long enough to bend around the Earth.

At the other end of the visible light spectrum spectrum is blue light, which has a smaller wavelength, making it less flexible and less able to bend. 

Dr Mark Birkinshaw, a professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at the University of Bristol, told MailOnline that the phenomenon is the same reason the sun appears a dark shade of red when it sits low in the sky.

‘The light that passes through the Earth’s atmosphere hits the Moon and then gets reflected back to us, and it will be red,’ he said.

‘Technically, the red light is less scattered by the atmosphere than the blue, so more of it gets through.

‘From the Moon, the Earth would appear to totally-eclipse the Sun, and would show as a dark shadow with a bright red ring around it.’

The total eclipse begins at 7:30 pm UTC (8:30 BST), and ends at 9:13 pm UTC (10:13 BST).

The peak of the eclipse will occur at 8:22 pm UTC (9:21 BST). 

Only those in the Eastern Hemisphere will be able to view the upcoming event, with people in Europe, Africa and Asia getting the best seats for the lunar show.

Skygazers in South America will be able to see part of the final stages of the eclipse just after sunset tonight. 

The 99 per cent Waxing Gibbous moon over Whitley Bay ahead of Friday's Blood moon total lunar eclipse. The longest lunar eclipse of the century is set to take place today and will see the Earth's natural satellite turn blood red

The 99 per cent Waxing Gibbous moon over Whitley Bay ahead of Friday’s Blood moon total lunar eclipse. The longest lunar eclipse of the century is set to take place today and will see the Earth’s natural satellite turn blood red

Supermoon rises behind the Sultan Ahmet Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey ahead of tonight's blood moon lunar eclipse. Only those in the Eastern Hemisphere will be able to view the upcoming event, with people in Europe, Africa and Asia getting the best seats for the lunar show

Supermoon rises behind the Sultan Ahmet Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey ahead of tonight’s blood moon lunar eclipse. Only those in the Eastern Hemisphere will be able to view the upcoming event, with people in Europe, Africa and Asia getting the best seats for the lunar show

HOW CAN YOU SEE THE BLOOD MOON TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE?  

The total lunar eclipse on July 27 will be visible to large swathes of the Eastern hemisphere.

It will reach peak eclipse at 9:22 (BST), however, the total eclipse will last for a total of 1 hour 43 minutes. 

Skygazers in South America will be able to see part of the final stages of the eclipse just after sunset on July 27.

In contrast, New Zealanders will be able to watch the start of the eclipse before sunrise July 28.

It will not be visible at all in the United States.

Parts of central Asia, the Middle East and Eastern Africa will see the lunar eclipse in its entirety.

The UK falls slightly outside of the ideal viewing range, meaning people will see the total eclipse for only 84 of the 103 total minutes.

This is due to the moon being below the horizon in Britain when the eclipse begins.

Although the moon will be smaller than usual due to its distant position in its orbit, it will still be visible with the naked eye. 

If the sky is clear, looking up at the moon will be enough to witness the shadow of Earth crossing its surface. 

A telescope will undoubtedly enhance this, but is not essential.

Unlike a solar eclipse, where the moon crosses the path of the Sun, it is perfectly safe to look directly at the lunar eclipse. 

Areas with low light pollution will see a clearer eclipse. 

To escape this omnipresent glow, head to a high vantage point or the countryside.

In contrast, New Zealanders will be able to watch the start of the eclipse before sunrise tomorrow morning.

The lunar event will not be visible at all in the United States, as the moon will be invisible below the horizon throughout the duration of the eclipse. By the time it rises across the states, the eclipse will have concluded.

Parts of central Asia, the Middle East and Eastern Africa will see the lunar eclipse in its entirety.

The UK falls slightly outside of the ideal viewing range, meaning people will see the total eclipse for only 84 of the 103 total minutes. This is due to the moon being below the horizon in Britain when the eclipse begins.

For those lucky enough to have clear skies, moonrise will be at 8.49pm in London, 9.46pm in Glasgow, 9.02pm in Cardiff and 9.27pm in Belfast, with mid-eclipse occurring at 9.21pm and the ‘total’ phase ending at around 10.13pm.

After that, the shadow of the Earth will slowly retreat across the lunar surface until the partial eclipse comes to completion at 11.19pm. 

The total transition will last for for 84 minutes in UK, slightly shy of the 103 minute maximum in peak places further east. 

WHAT DO DOOMSDAY CONSPIRACY THEORISTS SAY ABOUT THE BLOOD MOON LUNAR ECLIPSE?  

The so-called ‘blood moon’ eclipse and the brilliant Martian vista just beneath it, offers a once-in-a-lifetime thrill for astronomy fans.

However, for some Christian fundamentalists, the arrival of these twin events is a portent of doom.

They are hailing it as a heavenly sign of the long-awaited Biblical apocalypse, as predicted by the Book of Joel, the Book of Acts and the Book of Revelation. 

The US TV evangelist Paul Begley, alongside scores of others, believes the simultaneous appearance of a red moon and red planet mark the realisation of prophesies made in the Bible.

One of them reads: ‘The sun shall be turned into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and terrible day of the Lord come.’

However, one should take comfort from the fact that US fundamentalists have poor form when it comes to predicting that blood moons augur the end of the world. 

To get the best view of the eclipse, make sure you are in an area with low-light pollution. For example, high vantage points in a built-up area, or ideally, a trip to the countryside should provide the best view.

Those who want to photograph the lunar transit will be able to do so with a bit of patience, a telescope and the right app.

Both Android and iOS have apps available to help capture a picture of the event. 

For people either outside of the eclipse’s range, in a region shrouded in cloud or unable to get outside, a project from the The Virtual Telescope Project will live stream the event from Rome’s Colosseum and the Arch of Constantine. 

Framed with the skyline of the Eternal City, the stream will show both Mars and the lunar eclipse.  

Blood moon above north London last night acts as a preview of the upcoming total lunar eclipse that will be visible from almost all parts of the world, but not the US

Blood moon above north London last night acts as a preview of the upcoming total lunar eclipse that will be visible from almost all parts of the world, but not the US

A lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, Earth, and moon fall in line with one another, bringing the moon into line with the shadow cast by the Earth. 

The fact the orbits and the sizes of the planets allow for solar and lunar eclipses is merely a happy coincidence.

Dr Birkenshaw explains that this fortuitous alignment is the only reason we get to experience eclipses. 

‘We’re lucky that the Moon is about the right size to cover the Sun – the Moon is slowly moving away from the Earth, so that in the past it would have obscured more of the Sun, and in the future we may no longer get a total eclipse when the Moon passes between us and the Sun,’ he told MailOnline. 

‘Of course, this happens over a very long time! The Earth is a lot bigger than the Moon, so it’s shadow is wider, so it’s easier to have a total eclipse of the Moon than a total eclipse of the Sun.’ 

The lunar eclipse will not be the only uncommon event tonight, as an unusually bright and large Mars will also be visible.

Professor Birkinshaw explained that while these events on their own can occur every few years, the overlap of the two makes this a special occasion.

‘Mars is unusually close to the Earth at the present – it makes its closest approach on 31 July, at 0.385 AU (35.7 million miles),’ he said.

‘So the juxtaposition of a good lunar eclipse visible in the UK and such a close approach to Mars is something that you get only every few decades.’

WHAT ARE THE MOST COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT THE LUNAR ECLIPSE? 

PA has revealed the most commonly googled questions that people have been searching for with regards to the upcoming eclipse.

What is blood moon?

During the eclipse, the moon is expected to take on a red sheen, with the phenomenon being described as the ‘blood moon’.

It will pass into the shadow of the Earth, blocking the light from the sun and the atmosphere of the Earth will bend the light of the sun onto the moon.

Because blue and violet wavelengths are scattered more than red and orange ones, more of the red wavelengths reach the moon, making the moon appear red.

When was the last blood moon?

The last blood moon was observed on January 31 2018.

It was also a supermoon – meaning the Earth’s natural satellite appeared 14% bigger and 30% brighter in the sky as it reached its closest point to our planet.

Will the blood moon be visible in the UK?  

For those lucky enough to have clear skies, moonrise will be at 8.49pm in London, 9.46pm in Glasgow, 9.02pm in Cardiff and 9.27pm in Belfast, with mid-eclipse occurring at 9.21pm and the ‘total’ phase ending at around 10.13pm.

After that, the shadow of the Earth will slowly retreat across the lunar surface until the partial eclipse comes to completion at 11.19pm.

The eclipse will not be visible to residents of the US as  by the time the moon rises at night in the US, it will have already completed its journey through Earth’s shadow, or Umbra. 

For those lucky enough to have clear skies, moonrise will be at 8.49pm in London, 9.46pm in Glasgow, 9.02pm in Cardiff and 9.27pm in Belfast, with mid-eclipse occurring at 9.21pm and the 'total' phase ending at around 10.13pm

For those lucky enough to have clear skies, moonrise will be at 8.49pm in London, 9.46pm in Glasgow, 9.02pm in Cardiff and 9.27pm in Belfast, with mid-eclipse occurring at 9.21pm and the ‘total’ phase ending at around 10.13pm

How to photograph a blood moon?

For those looking to capture the astronomical event, preparation is key.

There are several apps and pieces of equipment to help amateurs and professionals snap the best image. 

How often does a blood moon occur? 

The red sheen that the moon will take on is entirely dependent on how much dust is in the Earth’s atmosphere.

As the sunlight has to travel around Earth, if there is a lot of particulate matter in the air then it will encourage greater rates of refraction, making the moon appear red. 

However, not all lunar eclipses will lead to a ‘bloody’ show.

The next total lunar eclipse will occur on January 19 2019. 

What is the blood moon prophecy? 

As with most eclipses, conspiracy theorists believe it is a sign of the end times and is referred to as the Blood Moon prophecy.

Only those in the Eastern Hemisphere will be able to view the upcoming event, with people in Europe, Africa and Asia getting the best seats for the lunar show

Only those in the Eastern Hemisphere will be able to view the upcoming event, with people in Europe, Africa and Asia getting the best seats for the lunar show

Where can you see the blood moon in July 2018? 

Only those in the Eastern Hemisphere will be able to view the upcoming event, with people in Europe, Africa and Asia getting the best seats for the lunar show.

Skygazers in South America will be able to see part of the final stages of the eclipse just after sunset on July 27.

In contrast, New Zealanders will be able to watch the start of the eclipse before sunrise July 28.

It will not be visible in the US. 

The Met Office has warned there is a potential for showers to develop across the eastern half of the UK, which will obscure theview of the eclipse. 

The best places to observe the celestial event will be towards the western parts of the country.

Also, those in the UK will miss a section of the eclipse due to the moon being below our horizon when it starts, which gives south-eastern observers a slightly better advantage than the north-western ones.

It will reach peak eclipse at 9:22 (BST), however, the total eclipse will last for a total of 1 hour 43 minutes.  

The main event will include both the longest total eclipse of the moon for a century but also put Mars the closest it will be to Earth for the next 270 years, a double treat for anyone looking at the sky

The main event will include both the longest total eclipse of the moon for a century but also put Mars the closest it will be to Earth for the next 270 years, a double treat for anyone looking at the sky

Mathematically, the longest an eclipse could ever last is 1 hour 47 minutes, and the length of transit depends on the alignment of the Sun, Earth and the moon as well as how far away the moon is from us. The further away it is, the longer it spends in the shadow - known as Umbra - of our planet. Tonight, the moon is approaching apogee, the furthest point away from us in orbit

Mathematically, the longest an eclipse could ever last is 1 hour 47 minutes, and the length of transit depends on the alignment of the Sun, Earth and the moon as well as how far away the moon is from us. The further away it is, the longer it spends in the shadow – known as Umbra – of our planet. Tonight, the moon is approaching apogee, the furthest point away from us in orbit

Throughout the month of July, the orbit of Mars and Earth will align in a rare phenomenon known as perihelic opposition.

This occurs when Mars reaches its closest point to the sun at the same time as Earth’s orbit brings it directly between the two. 

The exact point occurred at 6am BST (1am ET) earlier today, but today’s view of Mars will be one of the most spectacular since the August 2003 opposition.

Mars will appear to rise in the east just as the sun sets in the west, making the sunlit side of the planet visible all night long. 

Perihelic opposition, which will also make the red planet appear brighter, can be seen with the naked eye.

Stargazers all over the world will be able to see the red planet, although those in the southern hemisphere will get the best view.

In the days before Mars Close Approach, the planet will look around three times brighter in our sky than it normally does.

Throughout the month of July, the orbit of Mars and Earth will align in a rare phenomenon known as perihelic opposition. The exact point occurred at 6am BST (1am ET) earlier today, but today's view of Mars will be one of the most spectacular since the August 2003 opposition

Throughout the month of July, the orbit of Mars and Earth will align in a rare phenomenon known as perihelic opposition. The exact point occurred at 6am BST (1am ET) earlier today, but today’s view of Mars will be one of the most spectacular since the August 2003 opposition

Mars will be up all night, rising after sunset and setting at sunrise. Mars should be visible in the southeast, located just below the Sagittarius constellation, with Saturn also nearby 

Mars will be up all night, rising after sunset and setting at sunrise. Mars should be visible in the southeast, located just below the Sagittarius constellation, with Saturn also nearby 

HOW TO VIEW MARS IN THE NIGHT SKY, AS RED PLANET PASSES CLOSER TO EARTH THAN USUAL 

On July 27, Mars will pass closer to Earth than it has done for 15 years.

The phenomenon, known as perihelic opposition, will make the red planet appear larger and brighter than normal in the night sky.

The rare event occurs when Mars reaches its closest point to the sun as the same time as Earth’s orbit brings it directly between the two.

Although the actual point of opposition will take place on July 27, Mars will be noticeably larger for the majority of the month of July.

Perihelic opposition can be seen with the naked eye, meaning there’s no need for expensive equipment for stargazers to spot the rare event next month. 

It will outshine Jupiter, registering as some 1.8 times brighter in the night sky.

Mars will be up all night, rising after sunset and setting at sunrise.

Stargazers hoping to spot the red planet from the northern hemisphere should check the sky in the hours before dawn.

Mars should be visible in the southeast, located just below the Sagittarius constellation.

Meanwhile, the best view of the phenomenon will be enjoyed in the southern hemisphere. 

For example, New Zealand capital Wellington will enjoy a view of the red planet as it reaches a maximum altitude of 74 degrees in the sky at the end of July.

It will also outshine Jupiter, registering as 1.8 times brighter in the night sky.

That means Mars will temporarily become the fourth-brightest object in the sky, ranking after the sun, the moon and Venus.

Mars will be up all night, rising after sunset and setting at sunrise.

Mars should be visible in the southeast, located just below the Sagittarius constellation, with Saturn also nearby. 

‘The closeness and brightness of Mars, plus the near location of Saturn (Mars and Saturn were in conjunction in early April) should make this good to observe,’ Dr Birkinshaw concludes. 

Some religious fanatics believe that the overlap of the two events could mean the endof the world is nigh. 

The so-called ‘blood moon’ eclipse and the brilliant Martian vista just beneath it, offers a once-in-a-lifetime thrill for astronomy fans.

However, for some Christian fundamentalists, the arrival of these twin events is a portent of doom.

The so-called ‘blood moon’ eclipse and the brilliant Martian vista just beneath it, offers a once-in-a-lifetime thrill for astronomy fans.

However, for some Christian fundamentalists, the arrival of these twin events is a portent of doom.

HOW TO TAKE A PICTURE OF THE MOON ON YOUR IPHONE

There are two main ways you can take images on your iPhone – with the built-in camera software, or via a third-party camera app from the App Store.

You will get the best results using a separate app, but there are some specific settings you need for both.

Using a night-photography app:

1 – Go to the app store and download a night photography app. For iPhone NightCap Pro app is recommended.

2 – Start by reducing ISO, which impacts how sensitive your camera’s sensor is to light.

To do this, launch the Nightcap app and slide your finger downwards on the left hand side of the screen. Set it the ISO to the minimum of 25 to 64, depending on the model of iPhone. 

You will get the best results using a separate app for iPhone. Go to the app store and download a night photography app, like NightCap Pro

You will get the best results using a separate app for iPhone. Go to the app store and download a night photography app, like NightCap Pro

3 – Adjust your exposure by sliding your finger up and down on the right side of the screen to adjust brightness, until the moon looks grey instead of white.

4 – Set your focus to 100 (infinity). This usually happens automatically, but if not slide your finger to the right in the bottom half of the screen to adjust it manually.

5 – Once you are happy with the way your image appears on the screen, click the circular shutter button at the bottom of the app to take a shot.

Using the iPhone’s inbuilt camera:

1 – Turn off the flash. This will only illuminate nearby objects which could ruin your image. To do so, tap the lightning bolt image from the top of the camera app and tap the word ‘Off’.

The iPhone 8 and iPhone X now feature enhanced capabilities in low light conditions, to ensure vivid colours are preserved even in the dark.

2 – Zoom in. If you need to make the moon more prominent in your image, now is the time to do this. Pinch on the display with two fingers to zoom in and out.

Digital zooms will reduce the quality of your image, so it is not advisable to use more than 2x zoom.

iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X will let you zoom in with an optical zoom rather than digital zoom, which will provide better results.

3 – Lock the focus on your subject by tapping and holding the screen where the moon appears. This will bring up the square autofocus lock box.

4 – Change the image’s exposure by using the sun logo slider on the right hand side of the autofocus lock box. This will prevent the moon from appearing blurry in your images.  

5 – Once you are happy with the way your image appears on the screen, click the circular capture button at the bottom of the app.

It’s best to do this remotely if possible, for instance, via the volume buttons on your headphones, to avoid any shaking from your finger.  

HOW TO TAKE A PICTURES OF THE MOON ON ANDROID HANDSETS 

Android users have similar options available to them as those on iOS, with a choice between the built in camera app and third party software.

Here’s a step by step-guide for the two methods:

Taking a picture of the moon on Android’s in-built camera:

Each version of Android may be slightly different, as the operating system can be customised by individual handset manufacturers, so instructions may vary.

1 – Turn off the flash in the camera app. The flash will only light up nearby objects and bounce light back into the lens, which could ruin your shot.

Tap the flash icon on the side or top of the screen and make sure to select the lightning bolt in a circle with a line going through it – depicting the flash as ‘off’

2 –  You’ll need to zoom in for the best results. If you need to make the moon more prominent in your image, touch the screen using two fingers and use the spread gesture to zoom in or the pinch gesture to zoom out. However, this will reduce the quality of your image, so it is not advisable to overdo it. 

3 – Many Android phones have a manual mode to drill-down and customise the camera settings. Open the camera app and then tap the three vertical lines icon in the top left corner, then tap manual.

4 – On the left hand-side of the camera interface, you will see a JPG icon.

Tap on it and it will switch to RAW JPG. This will allow corrections to be made to the image while keeping a high-quality image after it has been taken. 

5 – Change the Exposure Value by tapping the EV option on screen and selecting a low exposure.

6 – Select the ISO option and choose a value of between 80 and 100.

7 – Increase the shutter speed, using the S option on screen,  and choose the longest option. This will keep the shutter open for longer, so ensuring the camera is still while the photo is being taken is crucial .

8 – Once you’re happy with the way your image appears on the screen, click the circular capture button at the bottom of the app.

Using a third-party app to enhance your image:

1 – Go to the Google Play and download a relevant app. Adobe’s Lightroom app, which is available for iPhone, lets you enhance photos once they have been taken and get the most out of your Android’s camera.

2 – Open the Lightroom App and click on the camera icon in the bottom right hand corner, if you want to use its inbuilt camera. Alternatively, jump to step 7 to alter images taken with the inbuilt Android app. 

3 – Make sure sure the File Format is set to DNG rather than JPG. This is an uncompressed raw format, similar to those used by professional photographers, which captures far greater detail.

Adobe's Lightroom app, which is also available for iPhone, lets you enhance photos once they have been taken and get the most out of your Android's camera

Adobe’s Lightroom app, which is also available for iPhone, lets you enhance photos once they have been taken and get the most out of your Android’s camera

4 – Reduce the exposure by swiping left with your finger on the image, until the moon looks grey instead of white. If you take this too far, you can increase the exposure by swiping right. 

5 – Make sure your flash is turned off by clicking on the lightning icon in the top right hand corner and selecting off. 

6 – Once you are happy with the way your image appears on the screen, click the circular capture button at the bottom of the app.

7 – Edit your image within the Lightroom app, which uses technology from Adobe Photoshop to enhance your pictures. This includes increasing clarity and zooming in on an image once it has been taken.

To edit your image, click the X button on the camera window, then select the image you wish to edit. A range of tools are then available at the bottom of the screen.





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